+3 Interview: Kevin James Doyle: Loud Blond Bald Kid

“…in all of my silly lawsuit preparation, I have learned a lot about writing.”

WHO: Kevin James Doyle, Performer

WHAT: “First kisses, weird hairs, the cool group: navigating adolescence was a challenge for everyone. These painfully hilarious stories of growing up will make you feel thankful you never have to go back – and surprised to realise we all actually made it out OK. Hailed as a dynamic heartfelt storyteller this is Kevin James Doyle’s follow up to The 30 Year Old Virgin which was called brutally honest and wildly funny. Best Comedy, FRIGID Festival NYC.”

WHERE: Laughing Horse @ Bar 50 – Marquee (Venue 151) 

WHEN: 13:45 (55 min)

MORE: Click Here!


Is this your first time to Edinburgh?

I was at Fringe in 2017 with my first solo hour called The 30 Year Old Virgin. I had been wanting to come to Fringe for years because the thought of putting together a longer set with an arch and theme was always very intriguing to me. And all the chaos and creativity of the festival was definitely addictive. I am just glad to be back with a little experience and know that it was in fact true that you need rest or else you will get sick by week 2. What is exciting is in my last show I was sharing a wild story only I had, this show is about the embarrassing aspects of growing up that everyone has experienced, so I look forward to humiliating myself in hopes that after the show people will share all their humiliating stories from growing up because we all have them. I masturbated to the thought of my cousin for all of sixth grade and I am so thankful to finally get that information out of my head and into the world.

What’s the biggest thing to have happened to you since Festivals ’18?

I mean, well if you want the truth, I am involved in a lawsuit with my Landlord for not fixing the door of my building and I was robbed. So I am suing her to try to get reimbursed for my bike that was stolen. And I will tell you this… I have done more preparation for this lawsuit than I ever have for material on stage. I better get a five f**king star review AND a judgement in my favour. It is actually funny because comedy and stand up is a lot about making your arguments and stories clear and concise and in all of my silly lawsuit preparation I have learned a lot about writing. So there’s the silver lining of my means of transportation being stolen due to my Landlord’s negligence!

Tell us about your show.

I started developing material about my adolescent years after I found a journal that I kept from a theatre camp I went to when I was 15 years old. I am so earnest and pretentious. I write about how I need to figure out if I am gay or not and I commit to being “not just an actor but an artist who paints on this pallet we call the stage.” It was so embarrassing to read I had to do it in front of audiences, who cringed and laughed along with me. I first premiered it earlier this year at the Frigid Festival in New York City and it won Best Solo Comedy. One entry says ‘I want to be great at everything, acting, directing, writing, sets, costumes. I think with hard work I will leave this camp with the knowledge to do just that.’ It’s funny to read that now and see that I am making fun of the younger me that wrote that but I am doing all those things at the biggest festival in the world. It’s funny but kind of sweet.

What should your audience see at the festivals after they’ve seen your show?

There seem to be more and more New York comedians coming over to the Fringe which is great and Emmy Blotnick is as good as they get. She is a great, great joke writer and just whips up laughter out of thin air with her presence. Go see her.


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+3 Interview: Who Is Daniel King

“A comedy about male ego, expressing yourself and dancing.”

WHO: Ed Eales-White, Writer/Actor/Producer

WHAT: “A story of a man who decides to be a dancer. Daniel’s living the patriarchal dream, everything that should bring happiness. It hasn’t. He discovers what he really wants, but is it what he needs? A comedy about male ego and dancing by Ed Eales-White. Writer/performer of Clever Peter and Bucket. As seen in National Treasure (Channel 4), The Crown (Netflix) and Olivier Award-winning Rotterdam (Trafalgar Studios/NYC). ‘Perfectly embodies the play’s balance between brisk humour and sensitivity’ (Evening Standard, for Olivier Award-winning play Rotterdam). ‘Eales-White the foppish, earnest auteur’ (Guardian).”

WHERE: Assembly Rooms – Powder Room (Venue 20) 

WHEN: 18:55 (60 min)

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Is this your first time to Edinburgh?

No. It’s my first time since 2015. I performed almost every year there between 2007 & 2015. I wrote & performed in comedy sketch group Clever Peter (2008-2014), acting in a play called The Head of The Fork (2009-2010), wrote and performed my a solo character show CHAMPIONS (2012) & wrote/performed in Double Act comedy show Bucket in 2015.

What’s the biggest thing to have happened to you since Festivals ’18?

I’ve had a daughter, called Rae. She’s wonderful.

Tell us about your show.

The show is called Who Is Daniel King, It’s the story of a man who decides to be a dancer. A comedy about male ego, expressing yourself and dancing. I wrote it and am producing it as well. The show will premier at this years Edinburgh Fringe and hope there will be plenty of life beyond the fringe with future productions in different parts of the UK and perhaps even beyond.

What should your audience see at the festivals after they’ve seen your show?

With Child, 3.30pm Pleasance Theatre. A one-woman character show, 6 women, one thing in common – they’re all pregnant -it’s very funny and entertaining.


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+3 Interview: Ane City

“Ane City is our company’s first project and we’ll be premiering it at Edinburgh Festival which is incredibly exciting for us both.”

WHO: Taylor Dyson: writer and performer & Calum Kelly: director, dramaturg and musician

WHAT: “Tay has returned to her hometown of Dundee for a summer of relaxation, drinking and self-discovery. But first, she has to get through a night out with her friends, hitting the streets of Dundee. From tacky pubs with seedy bouncers to revelations on the McManus steps with Rabbie Burns, Tay attempts to find herself in the city of Dundee. A theatrical, poetic one-woman show that combines elements of Scots language, storytelling, song and comedy. ART Award Winner 2019.”

WHERE: Assembly Roxy (Venue 139) 

WHEN: 14:20 (60 min)

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Is this your first time to Edinburgh?

TAY: We’ve been to Edinburgh a few times being quite local, however this is actually our second time performing at the Festival Fringe. In 2017, we took a Scots adaptation of Lysistrata for two nights at The Arthur Conan Doyle Centre.

CAL: We did it for the experience of taking a show to Edinburgh really. Performing at the Fringe is a world away from attending. The show was a feminist retelling of Lysistrata, set in a Glasgow pub, with songs. But Ane City is our first show as Elfie Picket Theatre.

What’s the biggest thing to have happened to you since Festivals ’18?

CAL: Unfortunately, we weren’t able to do any festivals last year as we were both completing Masters Degrees at Glasgow University, and all of our deadlines fell in August. However, we won the Assembly Roxy Theatre Award for Ane City and are just off the back of previewing the show at Prague Fringe Festival.

TAY: Which was such a fun and exciting festival to preview our first show at. We got on really well, and had some great feedback from audiences; it’s made us even more excited about bringing the show to Edinburgh.

CAL: I guess the biggest thing that’s happened to us since last year is that we both gained Masters Degrees and started Elife Picket as our own theatre company.

Tell us about your show.

CAL: The production is completely ours; Taylor wrote it and is performing the piece, and I’m the director and dramaturg.

TAY: We’ve been working together on it since 2018. We’ve been together as a couple for four years and our company Elfie Picket currently consists of just the two of us.

CAL: We created Elfie Picket last year with the focus of creating work relevant to a younger audience (16+) with a focus on Scots language.

TAY: Ane City is our company’s first project and we’ll be premiering it at Edinburgh Festival which is incredibly exciting for us both.

CAL: You’ll find us performing in Assembly Roxy Downstairs with the piece as we won the venue’s 2019 ART Award for new writing.

What should your audience see at the festivals after they’ve seen your show?

We would highly recommend Lucille and Cecilia by Bang Average Theatre, Cat Loud’s Torch Songs, Sugar by Lip Theatre Company and Gone Native.


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+3 Interview: The Struggling Life of an Artist

” It truly is challenging working with your creative partner in a different country … oh and then there is that little thing called adulting that tends to take up a lot of your time.”

WHO: Xiomara Meyer and Tamalynne Grant, Writer and director

WHAT: “A struggling movie actress and an aspiring horror writer are on the very brink of success – each just a compromise away. Jessica has been asked to upgrade her sex appeal. Olivia’s book must adopt a male pseudonym. Inspired by real events, this is a comedy (with the occasional song) about the insanity of male-dominated creative industries and the one conundrum every artist will undoubtedly face: the choice to forfeit artistic integrity in the name of success, or to stay true to their art but miss out on the opportunity of a lifetime.”

WHERE: C venues – C aquila – studio (Venue 21) 

WHEN: 15:40 (60 min)

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Is this your first time to Edinburgh?

X: I was here in 2016, as executive producer for the Impi Theatre Company, but this time around I come as a performer, too, with a company I co-founded, so it’s not as intimidating but still quite overwhelming. I have a somewhat better grip of what’s going on, but because the show has so many personal facets too it I feel that the stakes are higher. The Fringe grows every year, so I’m both super excited but also not sure what to expect. Luckily we have a spectacular team coming along with us (Stefanie Matei, Charli Weston and Sylvie Taniguchi) so I’m really thrilled to bring the show to Edinburgh.

T: This will be my first time performing at the Fringe. I think if I was purely coming as an actor then I wouldn’t be so nervous. However, since I also directed the show I feel the extra pressure. I’ve always wanted to perform at the Fringe and I’m extremely grateful to share this experience with my childhood best friend (as cliché as that sounds) but it’s true. There’s also something magical about going back to the roots, having my family come see us perform there. It’s all very magical.

What’s the biggest thing to have happened to you since Festivals ’18?

You mean since the last Fringe? Well, our lives have been consumed by this show since June 2018, so we’ve just been working on polishing it to be the best it can be. It’s not easy when half the company is in London and the other in Vienna, but we’re stubborn and determined and we make it work. We’re also quite adamant about taking on challenges: the more we revised each draft of the script the more we kept pursuing the “what if…” question and actually going through with the new ideas. We have since worked with an internationally acclaimed musician, two renowned composers, recorded in studios both in Vienna and London, filmed a professional trailer with an up-and-coming director, and made many connections to people in various areas of the arts.

T: I can only add on to what Xiomara just said. It truly is challenging working with your creative partner in a different country: Skype sometimes doesn’t want to work properly so one loses 2 hours just trying to sort out simple technical issues; files get lost over Dropbox; editing the script is a never-ending story, oh and then there is that little thing called adulting that tends to take up a lot of your time. It’s been an intense year full of preparations and planning, improvising, adapting and overcoming plans that failed. If anything I think this past year has helped us grow professionally as artists and has fully prepared us for this year’s event.

Tell us about your show.

X: The show was written by myself and co-written by Tamalynne.

T: In turn I directed and Xiomara co-directed.

X:The show was produced by the company we both founded, Hitting Heads Productions. We’re a small all-female company consisting of our production assistant Charli Weston, our social media manager Stefanie Matei and our technical manager Sylvie Taniguchi.

T: It’s been great working with the girls, they’ve been supporting us 100%, it’s nice to assemble a team who believe in your project just as much as you do. They’ve helped us gain more attention on social media, which was a huge plus! The idea for the story sprung from a monologue written by myself during my final year (we had to produce a 20-minute show) at my conservatory in Austria. The monologue relates to the struggles and constraints of being a woman in the acting industry, something I experienced first-hand at the conservatory, which is why I’m very passionate about these themes and feel very close to them.

X: At the same time, I was living in London and going through my own array of artistic shortcomings in the literary world, not to mention major setbacks in my personal life. Apart from being frustrated artists, Tamalynne and I are also frustrated millennials, so we shared a fierce passion for mutual topics. We met in high school and have known each other for over a decade, so working together is second nature to us.

T: We are like an old married couple when it comes to working together.

X: Yeah, and there were a few times during the rehearsal process when I’m sure both of us wanted to file for divorce! Anyway, we wanted to make the script personal, but also relatable. It began as a rant, but quickly turned into an exploration far beyond being a female in the industry – it’s also about the importance of truthful art in an age where everything seems fabricated for the consumer’s pleasure only. I know it all sounds like a deep dark topic (and it is), but believe it or not The Struggling Life of an Artist is a comedy. The great majority, at least.

T: The play really comes from the heart. We wanted to make the play a comedy because we believe that is the best way to approach an audience. People are generally far more open and accepting to sensitive themes as stated above when you make them laugh. I don’t think Xiomara and I realized how affected we’d feel, though. Not only were we trying to convey a message but we also did a lot of self-exploration: where our strengths lie and what insecurities we still have, all which ultimately shows itself in the characters we portray. This show has been a very interesting journey as an actor as well.

X: We recently had a two-night open house preview in Vienna, and the audience reception was superb. We don’t have time to do previews anywhere else before the Fringe, but we would love to do a European tour in the future!

T: We got a lot of positive feedback for our show, which was very humbling. We were so nervous, and all the hard work paid off. People laughed, they cried, they cheered. One could truly feel the audience go on the journey with us. We would love to bring the show back to Vienna (many requested us to do so) and anywhere else in Europe!

What should your audience see at the festivals after they’ve seen your show?

The South Afreakins at The Space on the Mile, Where to Belong at Summerhall, Under The Floorboards at PQA Venues.


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+3 Interview: Joe Bor: The Story of Walter and Herbert

“I’d like to turn it into a documentary or a film of some sort and maybe tour the show as well.”

WHO: Joe Bor, Writer and performer 

WHAT: “Award-winning comedian Joe Bor retells the story of the friendship between his grandad (world-renowned town planner Walter Bor) and his grandad’s best friend (world-renowned comedy actor Herbert Lom) and their journey from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia to the UK.”

WHERE: Laughing Horse @ The Lock Up – Lock Up 1 (Venue 238) 

WHEN: 15:45 (60 min)

MORE: Click Here!


Is this your first time to Edinburgh?

This is probably my tenth show at the fringe. I first performed in 2005 as part of a sketch group, I have performed almost every year since then, in a sketch group or as a solo performer. I haven’t been up for 5 years though.

What’s the biggest thing to have happened to you since Festivals ’18?

I was in a show called ‘Ultimate Bucket List’ for BuzzFeed, where I got to do a lot of things that were on my Bucket List, it really pushed me out of my comfort zone. I spend most of the show being scared. But looking back, it was pretty amazing.

Tell us about your show.

I have been working on the show for a few years, writing and performing it around the country, testing the material. It’s based on an unpublished autobiography that my grandad wrote. So I suppose he wrote some of it. It’s also based on interviews with family members. So I’d like to turn it into a documentary or a film of some sort and maybe tour the show as well.

What should your audience see at the festivals after they’ve seen your show?

I would recommend Luke McQueen and Nick Helm if they want to see something a bit different. Ian Smith always makes me laugh too.


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+3 Interview: Andrew White: Retirement Tour

“Then last year, I made the step up to a full month’s run with my second show ‘Coming of Age’. It was a lot tougher, and about 15 days in I really started to feel it.”

WHO: Andrew White, Writer/performer

WHAT: “What do you do when life comes to a crossroads? Write a show about it, of course! At 19 years old, Andrew White can’t help but question his next steps: should he keep slogging it out on the stand-up circuit? Or should he leave it all behind for further education? Is this truly the Retirement Tour? A brand-new comedy show from ‘one of the most talked about rising star comedians’ (EssexMagazine.co.uk). Weighing up his future, Andrew takes a hilarious look at the value of comedy vs the benefits of university. ‘Not to be missed’ (Daily Record).”

WHERE: Just the Tonic at The Mash House – Just the Cask Room (Venue 288) 

WHEN: 13:05 (60 min)

MORE: Click Here!


Is this your first time to Edinburgh?

This is my fourth year and third solo show up at the Fringe. I didn’t take any show up in my first visit to Edinburgh, but it made such an impact. My parents and I went on a week long trip in 2016 after my GCSEs and I just fell in love. I said to myself on that trip that I’d be up every year from then on, and so far, I’ve kept that promise.

In 2017 I went up for two weeks with my debut hour ‘It Was Funnier In My Head’, and had a great time. It was nice to dip my toe in the waters doing that shorter run, and I made a lot of good friends out flyering and seeing other shows.

Then last year, I made the step up to a full month’s run with my second show ‘Coming of Age’. It was a lot tougher, and about 15 days in I really started to feel it. My first two weeks were amazing, and I spent a lot of time with other comedians, making new connections, and just taking it all in. Unfortunately, a lot of my friends were only doing short runs and I was left on my own for a week before some family came up for the last few days.

It was a steep learning curve, but I still really enjoyed it, and was really lucky with audiences across the month.

What’s the biggest thing to have happened to you since Festivals ’18?

Since last year, probably the biggest thing that’s happened is that I went full-time with comedy.

It’s greatly subsidised by living with my parents, but still, I can’t believe I’m able to do nothing but stand-up and gig so much. I’m really lucky and extremely grateful.

I also have an offer for university to study Linguistics at Cardiff. So that’s a fairly big event in my life as well, which ultimately forms the basis for my new show…

Tell us about your show.

Retirement Tour is a stand-up show that weighs up the benefits of university vs the creative pull of pursuing comedy full-time.
With a gap year, and indeed, until the end of the Fringe to decide, can I bare to walk away from so many gigs for higher education? Is there any value in doing comedy anyway? Is it a healthy career? Was it appropriate to come out to my parents on stage as part of joke?

The show looks at all these questions, and is quite literally my life as I’m living it. It’s been hard to write at times, because I’m still unsure in reality, but it’s also been a useful way of talking my thoughts through. Comedy is a great way to process life I find, and it is cathartic to turn big dilemmas into comedy.
N/B though, it’s not just live therapy though, it is actually funny, and I try and keep it as relatable and accessible as possible, despite the rather unique position of my conflict.

I’ve been previewing all over the country at various festivals, theatres, and comedy clubs, and it’s starting to come together quite nicely. I’m excited to showcase the finished product in Edinburgh.

What should your audience see at the festivals after they’ve seen your show?

There’s so so much. I think my top 7 (because I couldn’t whittle down to 5) would be:
– Which Princess Are You? by Sunjai Arif
– Troy Hawke: Tiles of the Unexpected
– Laura Lexx: Knee Jerk
– Josh Berry: Who Does He Think He Is?
– Joe Wells Doesn’t Want to Do Political Comedy Anymore!
– Harriet Braine: Les Admirables
– George Rigden: Spooning with Uri


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+3 Interview: Give Me One Moment In Time by Doug Crossley

“Lyn Gardner … name-checked me as “a young actor of promise”, so yeah, basically, dreams can come true.”

WHO: Doug Crossley, Writer / Performer

WHAT: “Doug Crossley’s solo show brings together songs, comedy and the heartache of trying to understand a friend’s suicide. It’s happy, sad and sometimes silly. It’s a life-affirming love letter to shared moments in a theatre.”

WHERE: Pleasance Dome – JackDome (Venue 23) 

WHEN: 14:50 (60 min)

MORE: Click Here!


Is this your first time to Edinburgh?

It is my first show as a writer and performer. I have performed at the festival before (ten years ago – shit!) and along with a full run in an “adventure comedy” (still not sure what that is) that fringe included a twenty-four-hour rapid response written piece about Fred Goodwin who had at the time just heralded RBS’ spectacular fall into nationalisation. That was a collaboration with Stephen Moss who was writing an article for the Guardian. He dragged Lyn Gardner along to review it and she gave it one star but name-checked me as “a young actor of promise”, so yeah, basically, dreams can come true.

What’s the biggest thing to have happened to you since Festivals ’18?

Oxford Playhouse (and Louise Chantal specifically) decided to produce my debut solo show. That’s a bloody big deal for me. I’ve been hustling my way in this industry for a long time so to have a bit of backing from them is very new and very cool. The show has also been supported by Pleasance Futures as part of the Regional Theatre Partnership Programme. It’s a deeply personal show so having some help has made it feel possible to keep taking the risk to tell this story. I’m ridiculously excited/terrified about the whole thing. I also learnt to play the piano to do this show, which has been fun and a cheeky little challenge for my mid-30s brain.

Tell us about your show.

My show is called GIVE ME ONE MOMENT IN TIME. Written by me (Doug Crossley). I was on attachment as a playwright at Oxford Playhouse and immediately before the programme began I found out my friend had died. She wasn’t my best friend, but she was a deeply formative friend. I’ve spent a lot of my time as a playwright (10+ years) writing about trauma, shame, addiction, and most poignantly suicide. My friend took her own life. So, I spent most of my time on that attachment programme feeling angry, confused, and all the other feelings that come with grief. I used to think the theatre could save the world. I didn’t anymore.

Consequently, I really threw my toys out for the pram and didn’t want to write another play. John Retallack, who leads the programme, really championed this mini theatrical rebellion I was in and challenged me to just write. Since I’d “quit” writing plays, I played the piano instead. I took lessons and as I became a human being again I started to write songs. They were observing this one moment in time. Eventually, those songs started to weave a story. That story became this play. It’s a solo show, a musical I guess, about loss, grief, and anyone who ever had a mate that they dreamt big dreams of putting shows on with. It will premiere in Edinburgh this year. 2.50pm, Jack Dome. First Edinburgh. Next? The world.

What should your audience see at the festivals after they’ve seen your show?

Go see anything, and everything. At all hours of the day. That’s what I plan to do. I’ll be seeking out my other solo show compadres to compare notes and war wounds. I’m not able to recommend those shows yet because I don’t know what they are. But some others I’ll definitely be checking out are Spencer Jones, An Audience With Yasmin Day, and Bryony Kimmings.


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